Pirates of the Caribbean

Pirates of the Caribbean

Pirates of the Caribbean

Pirates of the Caribbean

Pirates of the Caribbean

Pirates of the Caribbean

Pirates of the Caribbean

Pirates of the Caribbean

Pirates of the Caribbean

Pirates of the Caribbean

Pirates of the Caribbean

Pirates of the Caribbean

Pirates of the Caribbean

Pirates of the Caribbean

Pirates of the Caribbean

Pirates of the Caribbean

Pirates of the Caribbean

Pirates of the Caribbean

Set sail and encounter a bunch of swashbuckling pirates as they bring havoc to a small Caribbean town.

"Yo Ho! Yo Ho! A Pirate's Life for Me!"

Adventureland is the home of sandy shores, tropical islands and hidden treasures - which is the perfect enviroment for every pirate...

And indeed, pirates have taken over a small Caribbean fort at the far end of Adventureland: deep within the dungeons of this old Spanish fort, guests are boarding small boats that will take them to an encounter with those bucaneers.

After sailing the Caribbean Sea - and along the shores, where the Blue Lagoon Restaurant is located - guests aproach an old fortress, whose purpose was probably to defend a colonial port against fierce pirates. And the first thing you'll see there is a group of not-so-happy bucaneers in their cell. But something seems to be wrong. The fortress is under attack! And before you know it, you're right between the attacking pirate galleon and the troops that defend the small village behind the fortress' walls.

But their fight seems to be lost anyway, because right behind the next corner you're in the middle of this Caribbean port where dozens of pirates are singing and drinking while they're plundering the village.

But that's not the end of story. After a litterally explosive climax you will see what becomes of those pirate captains with their eternal greed for treasures...

Pirates of the Caribbean is a true Disneyland classic. It has all what makes it into a masterpiece of Imagineering: fantastic sets, a great soundtrack ("Yo Ho - A Pirate's Life for Me" by Xavier F. Atencio and Georges Bruns) and amazingly lifelike audio-animatronic characters, which populate the ride.

This attraction is fun for the whole family and because of its richness in details you will certainly do Pirates of the Caribbean again and again and again and...

Tips

As guests exit they pass rows of screens which show pictures of themselves taken during their ride through the ghostly coverns... These can be purchased inside the shop Le Coffre du Capitaine next to the exit.

Because of its huge capacity, lines at Pirates of the Caribbean usually move very quickly through the dungeons of the fortress - accompanied by the great tune of "Yo Ho" - which means: you can visit this attraction basically all around the day even if the crowds are large.

If you want to experience some of Pirates' great Caribbean atmosphere a little longer, you may want to try the Blue Lagoon Restaurant. This table-service restaurant is located along the moon-light lagoon, which guests encounter right after leaving the boarding area of Pirates of the Caribbean.

Compact

  • Duration: 10 minutes
  • Number of Audio-Animatronics: 124
  • Number of Boats: 40
  • Capacity: 22 passangers per boat
  • Waitingtime: Waitingtime: 3 of 5

Specials

If the Pirates got you hooked up don't forget to set sail to the Firefly Lagoon an incredible website featuring the latest in flash entertainment to tell the story of Pirates of the Caribbean and offer never before seen photos and information!

Pirates of the Caribbean is a true Disney classic which can be found in Disney theme parks all over the world - even so none of its incarnation is an exact copy of the others, instead subtle differences have been added through the years to enhance the experience further. The version in Paris is the youngest of all currently existing and so features the most enhanced AudioAnimatronics and what is widely seen as an improved storyline.

But what do swashbuckling pirates, singing tiki-birds, hitchhiking ghosts and some of Hollywood greatest actors have in common? Answer: they are all highly advanced robots, called "audio-animatronics"...

When Walt Disney created Disneyland he wanted to have the opportunity to tell his stories in three dimensions. He was able to build the sets for his stories - but a certain element was missing: characters (except for a waving Indian chief along the shores of the Rivers of America and a dancing native along the Jungle Cruise).

But Walt was almost obsessed with moving characters. Ever since he had bought a mechanical bird in New Orleans during the late 1940's, his Imagineers tried to recreate its movements and enhance them.

Their first real breakthrough in that matter came in 1963 with the opening of the Enchanted Tiki-Room at Disneyland, where dozens of robotic birds - called "audio-animatronics" by Disney - entertained their guests. But why call it "audio-animatronic"? Well, back in the early 1960's, computers were still in their infacy. That's why the Imagineers used huge audio tapes to record the movements for its robots. When played back, those tapes generated audio signals, which caused the movement of the characters. (Quiet a fascinating method to program a system, isn't it? And nowadays all you have to do is click "Save" with your mouse...)

Just one year later, Walt introduced the next milestone of audio-animatronic technology: at the 1964 World's Fair in New York City, guests were able to meet a lifelike recreation of US-President Abraham Lincoln. Imagineering was able to recreate a man with all of his natural movements. The public was amazed and meeting Mr. Lincoln was soon of the top shows at the World's Fair.

But Walt wanted more. Much more. What he wanted was "The Rogues Gallery". This new attraction for Disneyland was supposed to be a guided walking tour along recreations of famous pirates. However, Walt knew that a walking tour would not be able to have a high enough capacity to handle the crowds that were sure eager to see Disney's lifelike pirates. Luckily for Disney, a new guest-transporting system had just been invented for a whole other ride: it's a small world. Here, guests were taken on a cruise through the show-building aboard boats that were comparable to an assembly line. This allowed an enormous increase of capacity for an attraction - as it did for "The Rogues Gallery" which now was known as Pirates of the Caribbean.

When the ride opened at Disneyland's New Orleans Square in spring 1967, Pirates of the Caribbean instantly became the park's biggest hit and one of the most beloved attractions of all time...

Saddly, Walt was not able to see this huge success of his audio-animatronic figures. Disney had died in December, 1966.

But the audio-animatronics lived on. And they are now one of Disney's trademarks: there can be found piloting starships at Star Tours, terrefying us at Phantom Manor, taking us on a wild trip through time at Le Visionarium or sleeping deep down in the dungeons of Le Château de la Belle au Bois Dormant.

And even though robots are not that special anymore as they were forty years ago, Disney's audio-animatronics have still a still a magical fascination: they are telling a story...

Limits

Pirates of the Caribbean is not being recommend for children under the age of one.

Please be aware that there are two (smaller) drops within the attraction where you might get a little wet.

DLP.info votings

Child:
4,0 Spacer
Atmosphere:
5,0
Youth:
4,0  
Thrill:
3,5
Adult:
5,0  
Music:
5,0
Senior:
4,5  
Themeing:
5,0

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